ePoster
Abstract Title | The effects of a combination of simulated patients with manikin on intravenous cannulation skill

Authors

  1. Zwasta Pribadi Mahardhika
  2. Ova Emilia
  3. Angela Nur Agni

Theme

Simulators and Simulation

Category

Simulation

INSTITUTION

Faculty of Medicine YARSI University

Conclusion

Procedural skills learning using a combination of simulated patients with manikin improved the achievement of intravenous cannulation skills.

Background

Physicians are required to have competency in performing clinical procedures that consist of technical skills, communication skills and other professional behavior. However, these skills are often taught separately while studying in the clinical skills laboratory. This study aimed to determine the effect of procedural skills learning using a combination of simulated patients with manikin on the achievement of students’ procedural skills

Take-home Messages

Learning procedural skill combined with simulated patient will bring the student more close to real context

Summary of Work

This experimental study used a post-test only control group design. The research subjects were 60 third semester students taken with cluster random sampling and random assignment to split the subjects into the control group (learning only with manikin) and the intervention group (learning combination using patients and manikin). The measured skill was the intravenous cannulation skill using the Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI) rating scale and questionnaires on the perceptions of procedural skill learning. The statistical analysis used Mann-Whitney test and Independent t-tests.

Acknowledgement

The author would like to thank Gandes Retno Rahayu and Bambang Djarwoto who gave precious feedback about the methodology. They would also like to thank Wening Sari as YARSI Skills Lab Coordinator and the many students, staffs, and also simulated patients who contributed to the success of this research.

Summary of Results

The mean value of the total IPPI rating scale of the intervention group was significantly higher (p <0,01;ES >0,8) than that of the control group.

References

Kneebone, RL., Kidd, J., Nestel D., Asvall S., Paraskeva, P., & Darzi, A. (2002) An innovative model for teaching and learning clinical.Medical Education,36:628-634.

Moulton, CA., Tabak, D., Kneebone, R., Nestel, D., MacRae, H., & LeBlanc, VR. (2009) Teaching communication skills using the Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI): A randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Surgery, 197, pp. 113-118.

Nestel, D., Kidd, J., & Kneebone, R. (2003a) Communicating during procedures: development of a rating scale. Medical Education, 37, pp. 480-481.

Conclusion
Background
Take-home Messages
Summary of Work
Acknowledgement
Summary of Results

Comparison of IPPI Rating Scale Score

No

Assessment items

p

 
 
 

1

Introduction/establish rapport

0.431

 

2

Explanation of intervention including patient’s consent to proceed

0.431

 

3

Assessment of patient’s needs before procedure

0.601

 

4

Preparation for procedure

0.015*

 

5

Technical performance of procedure

0.005*

 

6

Maintenance of asepsis

0.021*

 

7

Awareness of patient’s needs during procedure

0.014*

 

8

Closure of the procedure including explanation of follow-up care

0.865

 

9

Clinical safety

0.000**

 

10

Professionalism

0.010*

 

11

Overall ability to perform the procedure
(including technical and professional skills)

0.005*

 

 

Total Nilai

0.001**

 

                   *effect size >0,5; **effect size >0,8

References
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