Theme: Student as teacher
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Peer tutoring translates to the confidence level in the clinic and is driven by high motivation of the peer tutors
Authors: Institutions: University of Turku, Medical Faculty
Medical Education Research and Development Centre
 
Background

 

 

  • We have implemented peer assisted learning (PAL) in a clinical skills refresher course for medical students before their clinical attachment. 
  • Each of the peer tutors are trained and assessed by a clinical teacher and they receive structured pedagogical guidance before and after tutoring.

 

Summary of Work

 

We focused on the experiences on tutoring of twelve peer tutors with a semi-structured interview. Data were analyzed quantitatively. 

Summary of Results

 

 

  • All peer tutors reported improvement in their pedagogical and clinical skills, as was expected. 
  • Some reported significant translation to clinical competence when they worked as assistant doctors in clinics the following summer. 
  • Motivation was the driving factor for applying to peer tutoring as compared to pre-acquired skill level in a certain topic indicating a strong future motivation to teaching among peer tutors. 

      Peer tutoring promoted collegiality, and was especially valued by the peer tutors.   

Conclusion

 

  • Peer tutors are highly motivated to teach and learning while tutoring transfers to confidence in clinical work.
  • Peer tutoring offers motivating learning to tutors and tutees alike and would be perfect for scouting skilled future teachers.
Take-home Messages

 

Peer tutors are highly motivated and tutoring is a strong learning experience that promotes collegiality.

Acknowledgement

 

We thank sincerely emeritus professor M.D. Pekka Kääpä for the support in starting PAL tradition in our faculty together with the students. We are grateful for the scientific expertise given on studies on the subject as well. We also like to thank the teaching dean of our Faculty Risto Huupponen for the continuing support for the course.

Special thanks goes to Markku Iivanainen for the help in producing the video for this electronic poster.

References

 

Michael T. Ross and Helen S. Cameron, Peer assisted learning: a planning and implementation framework: AMEE Guide no. 30, 2007, Vol. 29, No. 6 , Pages 527-545 / doi:10.1080/01421590701665886

Olle Ten Cate and Steven Durning, Peer teaching in medical education: twelve reasons to move from theory to practice, Medical Teacher, 2007, Vol. 29, No. 6 : Pages 591-599 / doi: 10.1080/01421590701606799

 

Background

 

The topics included

 

  1. Reanimation
  2. ECG registration,
  3. Cardiac auscultation
  4. Blood pressure measurement
  5. Knee joint assessment
  6. Examination of tendon reflexes

 

The peer tutors

 

 

Peer tutors were recruited among 3rd and 4th year medical

students that had completed the clinical courses, which were

directly relevant to the taught skills: for example

anesthesiology for reanimation and neurology for tendon

reflexes. Each of the peer tutors were trained and assessed by a

clinical teacher prior to tutoring.

Summary of Work
Summary of Results
Conclusion
Take-home Messages
Acknowledgement
References

 

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