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Title

Student Perceptions of the effectiveness of a new clinical skills curriculum in Year 1 and 2

Theme

Best Practice in Curriculum Planning, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation

Authors

MS Khalil
M Soliman

Institutions

King Saud University, Department of Medicine

Background

 Early students’ clinical exposure to skills is essential for:

1. systematically learning and developing clinical skills appropriate to working in a clinical environment,
2. application of skills when they move onto their clinical rotations.
 

 The transition from preclinical to clinical training is huge for the students and several studies have documented that the transition is quite stressful
(O’Brien et al., 2007)
 

 Early clinical skills teaching is proved to show:

1. Significant improvement in the students’ knowledge and competence to perform examinations
2. Increased student’s perceived levels of confidence.
3. Enrichment of the safe environment that helps in bridging the gap between the preclinical and clinical years in medical undergraduate education.
(Swamy et al., 2013) 

Summary of Work

Based on SaudiMED, a new curriculum was designed in integration with PBL based curriculum in years 1 and 2 students of College of Medicine, King Saud University.


Teaching and Learning Modes:

 1. The clinical skills will be learnt by hands on the different clinical skills.
 2. The tutor will do a demo in front of students, and then each student is expected to do by himself
 3. The tutor will give feedback to the students according to the provided checklists

 

Mode of assessment:

1. Formative assessment during the sessions
2. Summative assessment: 5 marks The students will expose to 3-4 OSCE stations by the end of the block. 

A questionnaire was designed and distributed to investigate the perception of years 1 and 2 students in different domains of the clinical skills teaching and assessment. 

Summary of Results

 

A hundred thirty questionnaires (87 from year 1, and 47 from year 2 students) were received.

The majority of students reported that clinical skills: Increased their confidence when dealing with real patient Give chance to master the skills, Consolidated theoretical knowledge, Motivated the learning and skills, Motivation for becoming a doctor. Results The majority of students showed that OSCE was a worthwhile, tested their progress and give a good chance to demonstrate knowledge and ability. 

Conclusion

The early exposures of medical students to the clinical skills was satisfied and give a chance to master the skills, consolidated theoretical knowledge and has beneficial effects on increasing students’ motivation, selfconfidence. 

References

1. Curry RH, Makoul G. (1996): An active-learning approach to basic clinical skills. Acad Med; 71: 41e44.
2. Dornan T., Littlewood S., Margolis S.A., Scherpbier A., Spencer J. & Ypinazar V. (2006): How can experience in clinical and community settings contribute to early medical education? A BEME systematic review. Medical Teacher, 28, (1): 3–18.
3. Lam TP, Irwin M, Chow LWC, Chan P. (2002): Early introduction of clinical skills teaching in a medical curriculum e factors affecting students’ learning. Med Educ; 36: 233e240..
4. Lofaso DP, DeBlieux PM, DiCarlo RP, Hilton C, Yang T and Chauvin S, (2011): Design and effectiveness of a required pre-clinical simulation-based curriculum for fundamental clinical skills and procedures. Medical Education Online 2011, 16: 7132 - DOI: 10.3402/meo.v16i0.7132.
5. Marcus E, White R, Rubin RH. (1994): Early clinical skills training. Acad Med; 69(5): 415.
6. O’Brien B, Cooke M, Irby DM: Perceptions and attributions of third-year student struggles in clerkships: Do students and clerkship directors agree? Acad Med 2007, 82(10):970–978.
7. Rawekar A, Jagzape A, Srivastava T, and Gotarkar S (2016): Skill Learning Through Early Clinical Exposure: An Experience of Indian Medical School. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 2016 Jan, Vol-10(1): JC01-JC04.
8. Swamy M, Bloomfield TC, Thomas R H, Singh H and Searle RF (2013): Role of SimMan in teaching clinical skills to preclinical medical students. BMC Medical Education, 13(20): 2 – 6. 

Background
Summary of Work
Summary of Results
Conclusion
References
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