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Use of E-learning quizzes by medicals students
Authors: Joachim Neumann
Bernhard Kunstler
Ulrich Gergs
Institutions: Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany
 
Background

During the past years, our faculty has started to integrate items of eLearning into the standard curriculum of a classical medical school: the “Hallesches Medizinisches eLearning - HaMeeL”. Our hypothesis was that these eLearning tools would improve the willingness of students to spend more time into learning and this would lead to an improved outcome (in multiple choice tests). In pharmacology, we designed multiple choice questions as a study aid. These were given as 15 test groups, each test comprised of 8 to 12 questions.

Summary of Work

Methods


  • The courses for students (5th – 6th semester: experimental pharmacology and toxicology or 6th – 7th semester: clinical pharmacology) consisted of lectures and classical seminars.
  • Furthermore, we offered the possibility to use online multiple choice quizzes (involving 15 separate tests, each comprised of 8 to 12 questions).
  • The questions were made available to students via the content management system Stud.IP and the learning management system ILIAS.
  • The eligible students got access to the tests at the start of each semester and the first use of the tests was monitored for each student via ILIAS. We cumulatively summed up student usage of each of the 15 tests.
  • All students were subjected to a mid-term test and a final test to measure gain of knowledge.

Legend for all figures.

Conclusion

Summary and conclusion 


  • The usage of the online quizzes increased in the periods immediately before the exams.
  • The mean usage increased stepwise to about 50% (prior mid-term exam) and to about 80% of potential eligible users just prior to the final exam (winter semesters 2011/12, 2012/13 and summer semester 2013). 
  • Furthermore, in winter semester 2013/14 only 32% of eligible users took the tests (students intensively started to share the questions).
  • In summary, usage of multiple choice tests might be a sensible teaching tool. It is, however, probably only helpful if the questions are not widely exchanged between students. Moreover, we hypothesize that it is only used by students if they see an immediate benefit for their test performance.

Address for correspondence and poster reprints:

Sekr.pharmatox@medizin.uni-halle.de

 

Summary of Results

Results


Cumulative accesses to the tests in winter semester 2011/12 (maximum use by 219 students of 236 eligible students).


Cumulative accesses to the tests from winter semester 2012/13 to summer semester 2013 (maximum use by 185 students of 256 eligible students).


Cumulative accesses to the tests in winter semester 2013/14 (maximum use by 60 students of 186 eligible students).

Background
Summary of Work
Conclusion
Summary of Results
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